• HotSprings3
  • HirereClevedon2
  • GuyCGoss2
  • Miranda Hot Springs Circa 1933
  • Hirere Clevedon near Clevedon c1920
  • Guy C Goss - Kaiaua Quarry

Montana Wines

Croatian immigrant Ivan Yukich planted his first grape vines in West Auckland in 1934.

His sons Mate and Frank established Montana Wines in 1961, a company destined to become New Zealand’s largest wine producer with a high reputation across the world.

Montana developed New Zealand’s largest single vineyard on this property in 1967 with nearly 150 hectares (375 acres) covered in rows of vines, with Palomino grapes the dominant variety. The operation with a permanent staff of 30 local people was managed by Hedley Sunde

In 1971 they introduced the first mechanical harvester in New Zealand, a development that revolutionized the economics of large scale grape production. Until then up to 200 pickers would be required to harvest the grapes during a very short picking season.

All fruit from the vineyard was trucked to Auckland or Gisborne for processing and bottling.

Early in the 1980’s Montana moved the core of their operations to Marlborough. Government incentives to rationalize grape production, new varieties and the arrival of the root disease phylloxera combined to make the Mangatangi operation uneconomic.

mhhr 5/15

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Henderson and his Donkey

Richard A Henderson was the sole charge teacher at this school when it opened in July 1923.

He was born in Waihi in 1895 and although underage joined the NZ Army and served at Gallipoli, Passchendaele and the Somme where he was decorated for bravery.

The celebrated ANZAC paintings by Horace Moore-Jones depicting a wounded soldier on a donkey led a medical orderly is of Pvte Richard Henderson of NZEF Medical Corp.

The paintings resulted from Moore-Jones seeing a photo, taken by a New Zealand solder JG Jackson, following his return to New Zealand. There were a number of paintings of various sizes depicting the same scene. The most famous of these are held by the Auckland War Memorial Museum and the National War Memorial Museum in Canberra.

Although still subject to debate it is considered that the Auckland painting is the more authentic.

Mr. Henderson left Mangatangi in 1924 and retired in 1934, due to failing eyesight caused through being gassed while serving on the western front in France. He died in 1958 at 63..

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Mangatangi School

Mangatangi School

Application to the Education Board for a school was made in 1918 by Mr. George Stubbs of the Mangatangi Land Company and the first school was opened on this property in 1919.

The original building was a two room, lean to building previously used as a weekend bach by Mr. Hutchinson, an Auckland grocer. The building was adjacent to the Kershaw home.

Miss Ruth Appleton was appointed as head teacher with a first day roll of 9 pupils.

With a growing roll an application for a new school in permanent buildings was made and this school opened in July 1923 with Mr. Richard A Henderson as head teacher, with a roll of nearly thirty. The property of 2 hectares was donated by the Mangatangi Land Company.

Post and Telegraph Office

Richard William Bentley purchase 460 acres (185 hectares) in 1898 and in 1910 established the Post and Telegraph office with Mrs. Bentley as Post Mistress.

A telegraph line of sorts had first been erected in 1863 to connect the Redoubt at Miranda to the headquarters of General Cameron at Pokeno

The telegraph line had been extended to Thames as an essential communications link with the town of Thames which was booming following the discovery of gold in the Coromandel Ranges.

Mr. Bentley sold the property to Mr. Tom Hutchinson and then retired to Papatoetoe where he died in 1962 at the respectable age of 92.  The Bentley homestead was destroyed by fire in 1958.

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Surrey Redoubt

This redoubt was established in December 1863 and was one of three between Pokino and Miranda on the Firth of Thames. It was the command post for the 70th Regiment.

The three redoubts were establish as the eastern flank of General Cameron’s defenses before  invading the Waikato during the New Zealand land Wars.

On very short notice a force of nearly 1000 troops and officers were assembled in Auckland to become The Thames Expedition under Lt Colonel Robert Carey.

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Esk Redoubt

This redoubt was established in December 1863 and was one of three built between Queen’s Redoubt at Pokino (Pokeno) and Miranda on the Firth of Thames.

The three redoubts were established in December 1863 to be the eastern flank of General Cameron’s defences before he invaded the Waikato during the New Zealand land Wars.

On very short notice a force of nearly 1000 troops and officers were assembled in Auckland to become The Thames Expedition under Lt Colonel Robert Carey.

They left Auckland on the 16th of November aboard the well armed corvettes HMS Miranda and HMS Esk with a number of support vessels carrying horses and supplies.

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Miranda Redoubt

This redoubt was established in December 1863 and was one of three between Queen’s Redoubt at Pokino (Pokeno) and the coast of the Firth of Thames.

The three redoubts were established as the eastern flank of General Cameron’s defenses before invading the Waikato during the New Zealand land Wars.

On very short notice a force of nearly 1000 troops and officers were assembled in Auckland to become The Thames Expedition under Lt Colonel Robert Carey.

They left Auckland on the 16th of November aboard the well armed corvettes HMS Miranda and HMS Esk with a number of support vessels carrying horses and supplies.

The redoubt was named after the ship Miranda.

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Stubbs Bridge

The first bridge across the Mangatangi River was built in 1922.

Prior to that date all traffic had to ford the river just upstream of the present bridge.

This was often a challenge as the river was prone to quick flooding and carried twice the current flow as it was not controlled as it is now with the Mangatangi Dam and reservoir.

Mr. George Stubbs was a successful business man in Taranaki before moving to Mangatangi where he set up the Mangatangi Land Co. He was considered to be the father of Mangatangi and was responsible for a number of local initiatives.

As proper access to the district was an obstacle to progress Mr. Stubbs lobbied long and hard to have the local council build the wooden one way bridge and ended up taking on the task of supervising the construction as no reasonable tenders eventuated.

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Pokeno to Paeroa Railway

First proposed in the early 1900’s work commenced on this railway route in January 1938.

The Hon Bob Semple was on hand to turn the first sod in Paeroa while work also commenced at the Pokeno end of the line.

When completed this new line would avoid the lengthy dog leg via Frankton and reduce the trip time from Auckland to Paeroa by nearly two hours.

A similar time saving would also accrue to the trip to Tauranga and eventually to the end of the line at Taneatua.

At that time there were also plans to extend the line from Taneatua to Gisborne with some work already underway near Gisborne.

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Mangatangi Hall

mtphall

 

Seventy five years ago the school was the only public building in the district and for years it served as both school and hall, as most public meetings were held there. However, larger meetings, such as political meetings, dances etc., were mostly held in a woolshed a short distance down Kaiaua Rd., owned by Mr. John Cummings senior.

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Mangatawhiri Valley Creamery

creamery

A creamery was established on the Keith property in Mangatawhiri in 1895.

It was later moved to Lyons Rd, beside the Mangatawhiri stream, under the ownership of 14 local famers. The creamery was operated by the "New Zealand Dairy Assn."

A manager's house was built nearby and is still occupied today.

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